Canada
Supreme Court denies appeal to three 'Toronto 18' convicted

Zakaria Amara (L) and Saad Khalid (R)

Credits: REUTERS/STRINGER

QMI AGENCY

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court decided Thursday not to hear the sentence appeals of three members of the so-called Toronto 18 terrorist group.

Zakaria Amara, the presumed ringleader of the extremist Muslim group, was sentenced in January 2010 to life in prison with no possibility of parole for 10 years for his part in a plot to bomb Toronto landmarks. The Ontario Court of Appeal dismissed his appeal later that year.

Saad Khalid was originally sentenced in 2009 to 14 years in prison with a seven-year credit for time-served in pre-sentence custody. In 2010, the Court of Appeal increased his sentence to 20 years with the same seven-year credit for time-served.

The Court of Appeal also increased Saad Gaya's 4 1/2-year sentence, including credit for 43 1/2 months spent in pre-sentence custody, to 10 1/2 years in prison plus credit for time-served.
The Supreme Court's ruling means those sentences are final.

The men were convicted of terror charges in 2009 after they admitted to hatching a plot to detonate truck bombs near targets such as the Toronto Stock Exchange, the CN Tower, an Ontario military base and the Toronto offices of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

Their goal was to force Canada to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan.


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