World
Magnotta transferred to prison, won't fight extradition

A police car drives through the gate of a building of a Berlin state police department where detained Canadian murder suspect Luka Rocco Magnotta is held, June 5, 2012.

Credits: REUTERS/THOMAS PETER

DAVID AKIN | QMI AGENCY

BERLIN - At his hearing Tuesday morning, accused Canadian killer Luka Magnotta told the judge he would not object to being sent back to Canada.

But he won't be home to face his pending charges immediately, and may put up a fight yet.

The 29-year-old murder suspect, wanted in connection with the gruesome killing and dismemberment of Jun Lin, a Chinese national who was studying engineering at a university in Montreal, was transferred to high-security prison Moabit in Germany after a quick hearing in his Berlin cell with only a judge and a lawyer present.

A police spokesman said that while Magnotta did not voice concern about extradition, he left the option open to fight it later, when the issue arises in future appearances.

The high-profile Canadian suspect spent his first night in jail in a holding cell at a police station in central Berlin.

Magnotta was a model prisoner, police said, spending the night by himself in a small four-foot by 15-foot cell.

After being the subject of an intense international manhunt for the last several days, Magnotta was arrested peacefully by half-a-dozen German police officers Monday at an Internet cafe here.

"When I saw him today, he was still asleep. The policemen that guard him say that there was no incident during the night. Everything was quiet," Berlin police spokesman Stefan Redlich told QMI Agency outside police headquarters here Tuesday morning.

Canadian police say Magnotta had been on the lam since Lin's murder, believed to have occurred on May 24 or May 25. Montreal police say Magnotta left Canada on May 26.
It's believed Magnotta flew to Paris, then took a bus to Berlin Friday night.

On Monday afternoon, Magnotta visited an Internet cafe here. Staff there saw him surfing for porn and looking at web pages about himself.

When confronted by police, Magnotta gave himself up peacefully saying, "You got me."

Police in Berlin are now trying to piece together his activities here in Berlin.

When he arrived at the central Berlin police station Tuesday afternoon, he was given a change of clothes, fingerprinted, photographed, and had a meal of bread and cheese followed by a cigarette.

On Tuesday morning, Magnotta had a breakfast of toast, jam and tea.

Meanwhile, officials here and in Canada started the process to extradite Magnotta from Germany to Canada.
Canadian embassy officials would not say, for privacy reasons, if they had provided Magnotta with a lawyer.

"As a Canadian citizen, he is entitled to consular services," said Nathalie Niedoba, a Canadian embassy spokesperson in Berlin. "We are standing by to provide them."

German state prosecutors said Magnotta's extradition proceeding will be a relatively quick affair and that he will not be able to delay his transfer to Canada. They said Canada and Germany have a sound extradition treaty and co-operate well on law enforcement matters.

Magnotta, a former porn actor and stripper, faces charges in Canada of first-degree murder, indignity to a corpse and production and distribution of obscene material.

He also faces charges of criminal harassment towards Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Parliament.

"I'm obviously pleased that the suspect has been arrested and I just want to congratulate the police forces on their good work," Harper told reporters in London where he is attending Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee celebrations.

Magnotta's case has been big news in Europe. Though he's yet to be convicted of any crime, the French press have dubbed him "The Dismemberer" and the English tabloids refer to him alternately as the "Canadian Psycho" or the "Cannibal Killer."

Still, his arrest in Berlin was pushed off the front page by another gruesome story. A Berlin man was arrested Monday and is accused of beheading his pregnant wife in front of their six children.

That individual is in the same facility as Magnotta, a few jail cells away.

Magnotta's case quickly made international headlines after a janitor found Lin's torso stuffed in a suitcase behind a Montreal apartment building a week ago. Magnotta is suspected to have mailed parts of Lin's body to the federal Conservatives and the Liberals.

A source told QMI Agency Magnotta and Lin were dating, and Magnotta became angry when Lin broke off the relationship and started dating another man.

The source said it was Lin's new partner who reported Lin missing to police.

In a gruesome twist, a video clip of the murder was posted on a gore website, and police have said the video depicts acts that took place in Magnotta's west-end apartment.

Magnotta was raised mainly by his grandparents and grew up in east-end Toronto and in Lindsay, Ont., northeast of the city.

He had a massive Internet presence and also worked in the gay porn industry before recently moving to Montreal.

- With files from Daniel Proussalidis and Brian Daly

 

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